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7 April, 2017

THE 41 MOST IMPORTANT HOT DOG STYLES IN AMERICA

Posted in : Hot Dog, Unhealthy, USA on by : EyeOnFood Tags: , , ,

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THE 41 MOST IMPORTANT HOT DOG STYLES IN AMERICA

Burgers, step aside. Corn on the cob, stay in your lane. Apple pie? Nice try. No, there is no food more American, more essential to our national identity, than the almighty hot dog.

Call them wieners, bangers, franks, or dogs: this is the cuisine that makes us proud to call ourselves bloated, oily skinned, and ever-thirsty Americans. They’re handheld snacks that animate childhood camping trips and Sunday afternoon ball games alike. A shared love for this national dish unites folks from sea to shining sea, and yet each US region reps its own unique take on this special meal on-the-go, reflecting the same fiercely independent spirit exhibited by our sausage-loving forefathers. By our count, there are 41 different regional hot dog varieties. Here they are, in all their natural-cased glory.

Papaya dog

Place of origin: A fast-disappearing assortment of storefront locations around New York City (Papaya King, Gray’s Papaya, etc.)
The dog: An all-beef Sabrett frank in a natural casing, griddled and served on a toasted bun with deli-style mustard, tart sauerkraut, and each vendor’s signature version of the ubiquitous red onion sauce (a mix of onions, tomato paste, and vinegar).

Dirty-water dog

Place of origin: The mean streets (and takeout joints) of New York City
The dog: A skinless, all-beef, kosher dog (usually Hebrew National or Sabrett), boiled in a deep tank of questionably sanitary water, topped with a stripe of spicy, pale yellow, deli-style mustard, a spoonful of red onion mystery sauce (optional), and handed over in a soft white bun.

Italian dog

Place of origin: North Jersey, son
The dog: A hangover-curing, calzone-like mess comprised of a skinny, all-beef, deep-fried dog, crammed into a half-round of pizza bread and topped with fried or sauteed onions, greasy red peppers, and fried potatoes.

Half smoke

Place of origin: Washington DC metro area
The dog: A coarse pork and/or beef banger smoked and served in a traditional soft white bun with tons and tons of chili on top. Ben’s Chili Bowl is the most famous. But whether it’s the best is worth exploring to find out for yourself.

Texas Tommy

Place of origin: Philadelphia, PA, a good 1,700 miles from the Texas border
The dog: An all-beef dog sliced down the middle and stuffed with Cheez Whiz and crispy bacon, then grilled and served on a toasted bun. Philly does not mess around when it comes to bunned meat.

NY System wiener

Place of origin: Rhode Island (pretty much the entire state, which is unbelievably tiny) (still love you, Rhody!)
The dog: A griddled, all-beef dog in natural casing, garnished with meat sauce, mustard, chopped raw onion, and celery salt and sheathed in a steamed, side-cut roll. Olneyville New York System in Providence is the gold standard.

Fenway Frank

Place of origin: Beantown, Mass
The dog: A fat, boiled & grilled all-beef or beef-and-pork frank, shoved into a New England-style bun and dressed with mustard, relish, and, in some cases, a scoop of Boston baked beans (Green Monster sold separately).

Philly Combo

Place of origin: The City of Brotherly Love
The dog: A grilled all-beef hot dog, split down the middle and laid upon a wide steamed or toasted bun, layered with sweet, vinegar-based coleslaw and a stripe of spicy mustard, and completed — curiously enough — with a fish cake

Baltimore bologna dog

Place of origin: Charming Bal’more, MD
The dog: A kosher all-beef dog, wrapped in bologna, griddled, lined with yellow mustard, fit snugly into a toasted bun, and best alongside a crisp can of Natty Boh

Ripper

Place of origin: Clifton, NJ (and surrounding areas)
The dog: A deep-fried pork-and-beef dog in natural casing that tears and crinkles (i.e., “rips”) when it’s cooked, dressed with mustard and/or spicy-sweet relish and served in either a regular or toasted hot dog bun. Rutt’s Hut claims to have been the first to rip these suckers out back in 1928. They haven’t changed in the intervening decades.

Texas wiener

Place of origin: The surprisingly un-Texas-like town of Paterson, NJ (& parts of CT along I-95)
The dog: All-beef dog, deep-fried and topped with spicy mustard, chopped raw onion, and “Greek sauce”… a smooth, chili-like sauce made with ground meat and seasoned with cumin, cinnamon, cloves, allspice, and cayenne

Salami dog

Place of origin: Philly. Again. Hell yeah, Philly!
The dog: A char-grilled kosher all-beef wrapped in fried kosher salami, stuffed inside a toasted bun, and garnished with mustard and a sliced kosher dill pickle

Crab mac n’ cheese dog

Place of origin: Good ol’’Camden Yards in Baltimore, MD
The dog: An all-beef hot dog, grilled and nestled into a soft, chewy bun, then loaded with lump crab meat, hot, gooey macaroni & cheese, and a generous dusting of Maryland’s all-time favorite sodium source: Old Bay

Maine Red Snapper

Place of origin: Maine, of course
The dog: A grilled or griddled, violently red (thanks to food coloring) beef or pork frank in an extra-snappy natural lamb casing, stuffed into a toasted top-loading hot dog roll (i.e., a lobster roll minus the lobster), and topped with a spoonful of Maine’s own Raye’s “Down East Schooner” classic yellow mustard

Michigan Red Hot

Place of origin: Upstate New York (strangely enough *not* Michigan)
The dog: An all-beef frank steamed in a natural casing, doused in minced meat chili (no tomatoes, no beans, no problem), garnished with chopped raw onion and mustard, and loaded into a steamed split-top bun. Reminiscent of the coney dog, which, confusingly, isn’t actually from Coney Island (more on that later).

Troy mini hot dog

Place of origin: Upstate New York
The dog: A tiny hot dog link put out by area butcher shops, nestled in specially made 3in bun, and topped with spicy meat sauce, yellow mustard, and raw onion (generally eaten by the dozen)

Slaw dog/West Virginia dog/Carolina dog

Place of origin: The entire South, apparently
The dog: An all-beef dog smothered in either creamy or BBQ homemade coleslaw, meaty chili, raw Vidalia onion, and optional yellow mustard, and served in a traditional soft bun

Scrambled dog

Place of origin: Columbus, GA
The dog: A 50-plus-year-old recipe that includes chopped hot dog pieces floating in a bowl of chili, raw onion, pickles, and a smattering of oyster crackers. That, friends, is surf and turf, Georgia-style.

Texas dog (actually from Texas this time)

Place of origin: Texas, forever
The dog: A thick frank either grilled or griddled and loaded with salsa, shredded Monterey Jack, sliced jalapeños, and (occasionally) chili and served in a soft bun

Memphis dog

Place of origin: Memphis, TN, the home of both the blues and this artery-crushing monstrosity
The dog: A grilled pork sausage wrapped in bacon, then drenched in BBQ sauce, chopped onions, diced scallions, and shredded cheddar cheese and squeezed into a grilled bun

Chicago dog

Place of origin: Windy City, USA
The dog: A classic Vienna Beef frank in natural casing, simmered in water until plump or charred to order, cradled in a steamed poppy seed bun, and “dragged through the garden” (i.e., artfully decorated with fresh tomato slices, chopped white onions, sweet neon-green relish, sport peppers, bright-yellow mustard, a dill pickle spear or two, and a few good shakes of celery salt). Basically, this is a form of currency on the left shore of Lake Michigan.

Kansas City-style dogs

Place of origin: Kansas City, MO
The dog: An all-beef dog or pork sausage, griddled and tucked into a sesame seed bun, covered in melted Swiss cheese and a massive dose of sauerkraut, and finished (if desired) with a squirt of tangy Thousand Island dressing or spicy mustard

 




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