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10 More Of The Weirdest Food From Around The World

Posted in : Around The World, Facts, Weird on by : EyeOnFood Tags: , , , , , ,

10 More Of The Weirdest Food From Around The World

1. Stink Bugs – Africa

Used to flavour stews or eaten on their own, stinkbugs are said to have a crunch to them and taste a little like apple. Prepared by boiling, the bugs release defensive pheromones in a last ditch attempt to survive, and while it hurts the eyes it’s no more successful than the onion’s weak survival attempt.

2. Mopane Worms – Southern Africa

A big fat, juicy worm that’s said to be full of meat. Although traditionally dried or smoked to preserve, they are usually rehydrated and cooked with tomato or chilli sauce to flavour. According to an American couple who tried the dish on the Food Network, it tastes like honey barbequed chicken. One to give a go, I’d say.

3. Tequila Worm – Mexico

Not actually found in tequila but rather it’s cheaper cousin, mescal, it’s said that the legendary hallucinogenic properties of the worm are pretty much non-existent. All a marketing gimmick, you fools.

4. Marmite (or Vegemite) – UK, New Zealand & Australia

Made from yeast extract, a by-product of brewing beer, Marmite (or Vegemite as it’s known as in Australia) is essentially the slurry from the bottom of the barrel that most breweries just throw away. It’s a sticky brown paste with a concentrated, salty flavour that’s usually spread on toast or eaten with cheese. People are either ‘love it or hate it’… I hate it.

5. Pickled Egg – UK

Pretty much summed up in the name, this is a hardboiled egg that been left to go cold and stuck in a jar of vinegar. The sour liquid penetrates right to the heart, meaning the powdery yolk in the centre is uncomfortably sour. I’m yet to be sold on these.

6. Bird’s Nest Soup – Southeast Asia

This Asian delicacy is made from the nest of the swiftlet bird, who instead of collecting twigs for its bed, builds it out of its own gummy saliva, which goes hard when exposed to air. Usually the built high up on cliff faces, harvesting them is a dangerous business and many people die each year. Whether its ‘rubbery taste’ is worth this human sacrifice, I’ve yet to find out.

7. Fugu – Japan

Made famous by The Simpsons, this little delicacy has the potential to be deadly if prepared incorrectly. As such, only chefs that have been drilled to perfection are allowed to handle the serving of the pufferfish. Still, it’s said to make one mean little sashimi dish.

8. Steak Tartare – France

Is this weird? I mean, French waiters will still ask foreigners over and over again if they know what they are getting themselves into, but surely this is pretty well known now. It’s made up of good quality raw ground beef, served with onions, capers, raw egg and seasoned with Worcester sauce and other condiments, usually with rye bread or fries on the side. Considering I like my steak served blue this was always the next logical step – and man, is it good.

9. Cherry Blossom Meat – Japan

Interesting one to bring up after that whole European horsemeat scandal. While I have the same aversion most people do to horsemeat, I also kind of recognise the insincerity. I mean, once horses were our companions and transport. Now they are the playthings of rich people. Perhaps something of a nostalgic attachment? Anyway, cherry blossom meat is raw horse, served either on its own or as part of sushi. It’s said to be low in calories and low in fat, but it’s not something I can see myself trying, despite savouring the raw flesh of cows.

10. Frog Legs – France, Southeast Asia and other

What’s there to say? Basically the back end and back legs of a frog, grilled, baked, fried or stewed. With the texture of chicken with a very faint taste of fish, it’s one of my favourite kind of meats. Try it with chilli as part of Cantonese cuisine or roasted and served with a garlic and cream sauce – beautiful!

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