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8 June, 2018

10 Of The Weirdest Foods From Around The World

Posted in : Around The World, Article, Weird on by : EyeOnFood Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

10 Of The Weirdest Foods From Around The World

1. Stinkheads – Alaska, United States

The fermented head of a king salmon, buried underground in for a few weeks and eaten as a pungent, putty-like mush. Fancy it?

2. Shiokara – Japan

 

Now this really does sound bad. A dish made of pieces of meat taken from a selection of sea creatures, served in a brown, viscous paste of their own salted and fermented viscera. Oh, I forgot to say, it’s all served raw. You enjoy, I’m going to grab a bucket.

3. Jing Leed (Grasshoppers) – Thailand

 

So, yes, this is a big old grasshopper seasoned with salt, pepper power and chilli and fried in a big wok. Tastes a little like hollow popcorn skin… except a little juice squirts out when you bite into it… nice.

4. Wasp Crackers – Japan

Yep, you guessed it, it’s a biscuit filled with wasps. Think chocolate chip cookies, only the insects replace the choccy chips. Apparently the digger wasp, which the biscuit contains, has a pretty mean sting. I wish your tongue good luck.

5. Fried Spider – Cambodia

 

Fried spider is a regional delicacy popular in the Cambodian town of Skuon, prepared by marinating it in MSG, sugar and salt and then frying it in garlic. Apparently it has more meat on it than a grasshopper, but also has brown sludge in the abdomen, which consists of mainly innards, eggs and excrement. Yum.

6. Witchetty Grub – Australia

Part of the Australian ‘bushmeat’ family, this was another staple of Indigenous Australians in the desert. These can either be eaten raw, when it tastes like almonds, or lightly cooked, where its skin crisps like roast chicken and its insides take on the look and consistency of scrambled egg.

7. Escamol – Mexico

Also known as ‘insect caviar’, this dish is made of the edible larvae and pupae of ants, harvested from the tequila or mescal plant. Considered something of a delicacy, it is said to have the consistency of cottage cheese and a buttery, nutty taste.

8. Beondegi – South Korea

 

Mmm, lovely, lovely silkworm. Simply boiled or steamed and lightly seasoned, this is popular snack all over Korea and usually sold from street vendors. Apparently they taste like wood, if you’ve ever tried wood…?

9. Escargots à la Bourguignonne – France

 

Snails cooked in a sauce of white wine, garlic, butter and parsley served in their shells. Said to have a similar consistency to mussels or clams, though I found them to be pretty rubbery. Perhaps best to try in a decent, reasonably priced restaurant rather than the satay version down a back street in Hong Kong.

10. Sago Delight – Southeast Asia

Edible sago grubs are said to be creamy tasting when raw or meaty and like bacon when cooked. Generally seasoned and flavoured in the same way as the other Southeast Asian creepy crawly favourite, Jing Leed and served alongside. My friend gaged when she ate one and said it was pregnant – a braver being than me.

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