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Condiments How Its Made Video

How Heinz Tomato Ketchup Is Made

We visited Heinz’s European Tomato Ketchup factory in the Netherlands to see how the world-famous condiment is made. The dutch factory makes 1.8 million bottles of Tomato Ketchup a day, and has been making ketchup for the whole European region since 1958.

 

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Condiments Sauce Shopping Spicy

DO YOU LOVE HOT SAUCE? ADD THESE UNIQUE SAUCES TO YOUR COLLECTION!

DO YOU LOVE HOT SAUCE? ADD THESE UNIQUE SAUCES TO YOUR COLLECTION!

When you’re in pursuit of the very best hot sauce, the familiar bottle at the corner store just won’t cut it anymore. Maybe you’ve built up a tolerance—or maybe you’ve realized that its tepid flavor doesn’t give your scrambled eggs the oomph you were looking for.

At a certain point, it become necessary to branch out. Lucky for you, Lewd Foods and the internet has made it easy to explore the best hot sauces that the world has to offer—and have them delivered conveniently to your front door. Below, are my personal picks of the best of the best.  All are sold on Amazon and include delivery to your door in a few days.


Dave’s Gourmet Crazy Caribbean Hot Sauce

This spicy sauce is definitely on fire, thanks to a generous dose of Puerto Rican red habaneros. The secret ingredient—carrots—adds a bit of sweetness and earthiness to the flavor profile. One Amazon reviewer said that the price is a steal since one bottle contains “more hot sauce than one person would ever be able to use in a lifetime.” Challenge accepted.

Get a Bottle of Dave’s Gourmet Crazy Caribbean Hot Sauce

 

 

 

 


Pickapeppa Sauce

Mangoes and raisins give this Jamaican condiment a fruity profile. In addition to cloves, Pickapeppa is spiked with sour tamarind, black pepper, and warming ginger. Clearly there’s a lot going on here. Don’t pick it up expecting any old one-note hot sauce. Definitely serve it alongside jerk chicken. And then dash it over eggs, grilled pork, and anything else that would benefit from a taste of the islands.

Free shipping to your door here: Pickapeppa Sauce

 

 

 


Pain 100%

This habanero-based sauce has just a bit of tomato paste for sweetness. Mix a bit with olive oil, then brush it over a steak before grilling. The resulting heat was like sipping “an expensive whiskey—lots of flavor, but the steak doesn’t burn your mouth.”  Makes a great addition to your Hot Sauce Display!

Get It:  Pain 100% Hot Sauce

 


Seed Ranch Flavor Co. Thai Green Hot Sauce

A great companion for a stir fry or rice bowl, the handmade hot sauce includes lemongrass, Thai ginger, cilantro, basil, Serrano peppers, and lime juice. Plus, it’s Paleo, vegan, and sugar-free, if you’re into that kind of thing. Take the extra advice from Amazon reviewer Lodro: “After I tasted it I ordered a box and handed it out to friends as gifts for a month; I can’t recommend it more highly.”

BUY IT: Seed Ranch Flavor Co. Thai Green Hot Sauce

 


Yellowbird Habanero Condiment

This super-citrusy habanero hot sauce is a little thicker than standard hot sauce—more akin to Sriracha. A kick of both tangerine and lime give it good backbone to stand against the heat.

All-Natural, 100% Vegan,  Non-GMO,  Gluten-Free,  BPA-Free Packaging,  No artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives


Matouk’s Calypso Sauce

This Scotch bonnet–based sauce comes from Trinidad. Onion powder and mustard seed bring extra flavor, but it’s the peppers themselves that give it the fruity, tropical profile it’s known for. Bonus: Its thickness is similar to ketchup, so for anyone who’s been looking for the perfect hot condiment for French fries, you’ve found it.


The Pepper Plant California-Style Hot Sauce

Did we know that California had its own style of hot sauce? Not until now. This one is noted for being as much of a salty seasoning as it is a mildly hot one, so be mindful when dashing it over absolutely anything and everything (but especially burritos).

BUY IT: Pepper Plant Original Hot Pepper Sauce

 


D.L. Jardine’s Blazin’ Saddle XXX Hot Sauce

KatieD put it right: “This is my favorite hot sauce. My obsession is real and I’m not even slightly ashamed. It has a kick that will get you, but the taste is amazing and is worth the sting.” This sauce is deservedly popular in its home state of Texas. Now you can make it a thing in your home state, too.

All natural

Habanero hot sauce

XXX hot

BUY IT: D.L. Jardine’s Blazin’ Saddle Habanero XXX Hot Sauce


***EXTRA BONUS TRAVEL TIP***

Must have for on the go and travel seasoning 

Huy Fong Sriracha in Bottle-Shaped Packets

Yeah, you can get standard Sriracha bottles, but these packets are perfect for stashing in your bag, your back pocket, or your desk drawer to fuel that Sriracha addiction, whenever, wherever. And the bottle shape of the packets isn’t just for the cute factor—they also serve as easier-to-rip-off tops than your standard fiddle-with-each-corner-til-the-ketchup-explodes-all-over-your-shirt condiment packet. Stop stealing handfuls of mediocre hot sauce packets from your deli. Spring for the good stuff because you’re worth it.

Grab N Go Huy Fong Sriracha Hot Chili Sauce Packets (200 Pack)

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BBQ Condiments Recipe Sauce Video

How Do You Make Barbecue Sauce? – Homemade BBQ Sauce Recipe

How Do You Make Barbecue Sauce? – Homemade BBQ Sauce Recipe

Homemade BBQ Sauce Recipe – Ready in 15 minutes, you’ll have the best Homemade Barbecue Sauce that is sweet and tangy and made from scratch!

BBQ sauce is one of those topics that people can become really, really passionate about. There are the regional camps of North Carolina style BBQ sauce, Kansas City style BBQ sauce, white Alabama BBQ sauce, and then the Memphis style with no sauce at all (well, maybe just a smidge). Everyone has their personal favorites.

And you know, I really love them all.

Homemade BBQ Sauce Recipe

This BBQ Sauce comes together quickly with just a handful of ingredients that I generally have in my refrigerator or my pantry and is one that I think you all will fall in love with as well.

How to Make the Best BBQ Sauce

For this quick and easy homemade BBQ sauce, I start with ketchup. You can use your favorite ketchup as the base. I generally go for one that includes the fewest ingredients and doesn’t include high-fructose corn syrup.

To my BBQ sauce, I whisk in apple cider vinegar, brown sugar, honey, Worcestershire sauce (or coconut aminos if you are sensitive to soy or gluten-free), my favorite House Seasoning, lemon juice, and a dash of hot sauce.


Then, I let my BBQ sauce simmer on low heat for about 10 minutes to deepen the flavors and thicken the sauce.

Then, I remove it from the heat and use it immediately or allow it cool slightly and pour into large jar with tight fitting lids and store in the refrigerator to use on ribs, chicken, pork, salads, and so much more!

Here’s my best Homemade BBQ Sauce recipe. I hope you love it as much as we do!

Homemade BBQ Sauce Recipe
Homemade BBQ Sauce Recipe – Ready in 15 minutes, you’ll have the best Homemade Barbecue Sauce that is sweet and tangy and made from scratch!
Prep Time 5 mins  Cook Time 10 mins  Total Time 15 mins

Ingredients

2 cups ketchup  – Homemade Ketchup Recipe HERE

1/2 cup apple cider vinegar

1/4 cup packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce or coconut aminos

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon House Seasoning

1/4 teaspoon hot sauce optional

Directions

Whisk together all ingredients in a medium saucepan situated over medium heat. Allow to come to a bubble and then reduce the heat to low. Allow to simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes.
Serve immediately or allow to cool slightly and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Categories
Condiments Recipe Video

How Do You Make Ketchup? – Homemade Ketchup Recipe

How Do You Make Ketchup? – Homemade Ketchup Recipe

“This ketchup does come close to those name brands in terms of taste, texture and color. I’ve never had a tomato paste-based ketchup that I liked, so I decided to cook down crushed tomatoes instead. By using the slow cooker, we take most of the labor out of the process.”

Ingredients

2 (28 ounce) cans peeled ground tomatoes

1/2 cup water, divided

2/3 cup white sugar

3/4 cup distilled white vinegar

1 teaspoon onion powder

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1 3/4 teaspoons salt

1/8 teaspoon celery salt

1/8 teaspoon mustard powder

1/4 teaspoon finely ground black pepper

1 whole clove

Directions

  1. Pour ground tomatoes into slow cooker. Swirl 1/4 cup water in each emptied can and pour into slow cooker. Add sugar, vinegar, onion powder, garlic powder, salt, celery salt, mustard powder, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and whole clove; whisk to combine.
  2. Cook on high, uncovered, until mixture is reduced by half and very thick, 10 to 12 hours. Stir every hour or so.
  3. Smooth the texture of the ketchup using an immersion blender, about 20 seconds.
  4. Ladle the ketchup into a fine strainer and press mixture with the back of a ladle to strain out any skins and seeds.
  5. Transfer the strained ketchup to a bowl. Cool completely before tasting to adjust salt, black pepper, or cayenne pepper.

 

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Article Condiments

How Millennials Killed Mayonnaise

MUST READ ARTICLE ON MAYONNAISE

The inexorable rise of identity condiments has led to hard times for the most American of foodstuffs. And that’s a shame.
Read the whole article at PHILLYMAG

Categories
Condiments Environment Shopping

This New Stand Up Packaging Will Change How You Get Your Sauce




Americans hate changes in their food packaging. Now the condiment aisle is poised for a packaging revolution.

Remember when ketchup turned upside down? Or when half gallons of milk grew plastic screw caps on their sides? We are resistant to change in food packaging, attached to our squeezy honey bear, Toblerone’s triangular prism, the resealable paperboard tube that houses Pringles’s neat stack of hyperbolic paraboloid chips.
But what if there’s a better way? (Seriously, try going back to doing the pinchy-pully motion to open the cardboard wings of a milk carton without mauling things.)

Something new is coming, and soon you will scarcely remember when it didn’t exist. It’s called the Standcap Inverted Pouch. Daisy brand sour cream led the charge, debuting their Daisy Squeeze in 2015: a soft-sided, inverted wedge shape with a flat, flip-top dispensing closure on which it sits jauntily. It rolls down like a toothpaste tube, uses gravity as an assist and minimizes the introduction of oxygen, thus slowing spoilage.

And now the pouches are coming fast and furious: Chobani whole-milk plain yogurt, Original Uncle Dougie’s organic barbecue sauces. A major player in the guacamole business will debut its version Aug. 1.

What’s behind the pivot? Money is a motivator, but so are minimizing mess, cutting down on waste and conferring a halo effect via sustainability claims. In the first year of its pouch, Daisy reported a 69.7 percent increase in sales (despite charging about 25 percent more per ounce than for the traditional tubs). Other companies took notice.

According to Ron Cotterman, vice president of corporate innovation and sustainability for the packaging-solutions company Sealed Air, some of the drive for innovative packaging is a turn away from glass. He says in the past decade there’s been a shift for three reasons: One is the cost of transporting and storing a heavy product, the second is the perception of safety (consumers fear breakage and shards) and the third is that there are not a lot of end markets for the glass. There has been a significant shift away from municipalities recycling glass because of the enormous cost associated with it.

“Part of it is consumer-driven,” Cotterman says. “But it’s also about sustainability. Walmart has its Project Gigaton goal to avoid 1 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases from the global value chain by 2030. And Amazon aims to make half of its shipments carbon neutral by 2030.”

The race is on to replace heavy, bulky cans and jars with flexible packaging that can be stored flat for shipment before being filled.

That flexible standup pouch requires significantly less water, and produces fewer greenhouse gas emissions and other waste, says Evan Arnold, the director of product development and engineering at flexible packaging firm Glenroy, one of three companies that collaborated on the pouch.

“I just spoke at the Association of Dressings and Sauces technical meeting in Louisville and I asked everyone if they wanted to save the world. And I meant it, kind of,” Arnold says.

Fine, world-saving. For now the body of the Standcap pouch cannot be recycled (they’re working on that), although the cap can be screwed off and recycled. But let’s talk about flips, drips, lips and other quotidian woes. There’s the jerking motion required to coax a viscous liquid down the neck of an upright glass or hard plastic bottle (and the anguish of an unexpected deluge), then the wrist-flick flip back upright so gravity halts the flow. There’s the goo that accumulates around the lip and cap of a regular bottle. And there’s the vexing last 10 percent of a product that clings stubbornly to the container’s innards, taunting you and wasting your money.

Aptar is the company responsible for the Standcap’s silicone dispensing-valve technology. Regular inverted bottles with dispensing valves have a re-intake of air after you squeeze (like a shampoo bottle). Aptar’s invention dispenses and cuts off the product without introducing air. According to Rob Johnson, chief executive of Original Uncle Dougie’s, this feature dramatically extends shelf life.

But there are other reasons companies might be shifting to this kind of package. It’s about a cultural shift, taking a product like sour cream from an ingredient (the anchor to a casserole or coffee cake) to a condiment.

“All of the research going on would validate this,” Johnson says. “More and more people are using dipping sauces as a way for people to add flavor to food. A lot of restaurants are doing that.”


© Original Uncle Dougie’s/Original Uncle Dougie’s

 

 “There is a compelling sustainability story,” says Rob Johnson, chief executive of Original Uncle Dougie’s, on the new Standcap Inverted Pouch recently adopted for the company’s barbecue sauces.

The New York Times took some heat several years back for suggesting that millennials were killing breakfast cereal because there was too much cleanup. There is validity to this: Younger generations don’t want to dirty silverware if they don’t have to. Thus, the condimentization of foods. Look for the Standcap soon for nut butters, salsas and jams, that Aptar valve adjustable for different thickness and chunkiness levels.

For now, the Standcap Inverted Pouch is a novelty that stands out, and up, in the condiment aisle. (The more elongated the package, by the way, the more consumers perceive they contain, so the Standcap may trounce squattier tubs for eye appeal.)

But companies may also be playing to consumer psychology. Products that reside in the door of the refrigerator see more action. A tub gets pushed to the back of the fridge and into Siberia, green fuzz and solitude its inevitable fate. This new technology’s upright design makes it door-appropriate, living cheek to jowl with heavy-rotation items. The Standcap Inverted Pouch may, in a sense, give companies a foot in the door.

Categories
Condiments Science Video

Why Mānuka Honey Is So Expensive

Mānuka honey known for being is earthier, richer, and more viscous than many other honeys. It comes from the nectar of the flower of Leptospermum scoparium — also known as Manuka, which is only native to New Zealand. Mānuka, in fact, is a Maori word.

“The plant itself is very rare. It’s difficult to harvest because the flower is only open for 12 days, and sometimes we have to use helicopters to collect this honey.” John Rawcliffe from the Mānuka Factor Honey Association told Business Insider.

Although mānuka bushes can also be found in Australia, New Zealand accounts for almost all the world’s production, with exports worth 300 million NZ dollars ($204m) and expected to rise to 1.2 billion NZ ($800m) by 2028.

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Condiments Video

How Traditional Italian Olive Oil Is Made

We visited an olive oil mill in Italy in the southern region of Puglia, a region that alone supplies 40% of Italy’s olive oil production and 12% worldwide. Olive oil is an essential part of the culture here, from food to the picturesque landscape.

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Condiments Taste Test Video

Taste Test Of The Best Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

Our Taste Test of the Best Extra-Virgin Olive Oil at the Supermarket

Tasting expert Jack Bishop challenges Julia to a tasting of supermarket extra-virgin olive oil.

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Condiments Video

Why Real Wasabi Is So Expensive

The green paste you’ve been eating with your sushi isn’t really wasabi. If you check the ingredients on the packet, you might see a mixture of sweetener, horseradish and perhaps a small percentage of the real thing. Real wasabi is hard to come across and it can cost $250 per kilo. So what actually is wasabi, and why is it so expensive?

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Chefs Condiments Video

Brad Makes Mustard

Brad Makes Mustard

Bon Appétit Test Kitchen Manager Brad Leone is back for episode 39 of “It’s Alive” and this time he’s making mustard. Rumor has it this might be his best creation yet. Join Brad as he gets into “some serious science” and reveals the fermented ace up his sleeve.

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Condiments Hot Dog Video

Alton Brown’s Mustard Caddy

Alton Brown’s Mustard Caddy

An epic solution for the pesky condiment containers in your refrigerator door.

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Condiments How To Video

5 Ways To Pimp Up Your Condiments

5 Ways To Pimp Up Your Condiments

As we approach the festivities condiments are a serious business… Add a twist and some flair to your favorites with these simple and easy recipes that will have people asking “Oooh, what’s in that?”

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Condiments How To Video

Homemade Ketchup

Homemade Ketchup

 

 Learn how to make Homemade Ketchup!

 

 

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Chinese Condiments

THE REAL WASABI

wasabi

WOULD THE REAL WASABI PLEASE STAND UP? CHANCES ARE, WHAT YOU’VE ALWAYS KNOW AS WASABI IS ACTUALLY A LIE. BECAUSE OF ITS DIFFICULT NATURE, MOST RESTAURANTS ARE REALLY JUST SERVING A GREEN-COLORED HORSERADISH. IN THIS MINI-DOC, YOU’LL GET TO KNOW THE REAL WASABI AND THE GREAT LENGTHS FARMERS GO TO SUCCESSFULLY GROW THE TEMPERAMENTAL PLANT.

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Condiments

Strange Condiments Taste Test

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Weirdest condiments from around the world.